“From my Bachelors Degree to my first job” – blog post by Giulia Impelluso, GHSM alumna

Blog post by Giulia Impelluso

Alumna of the Undergraduate Programme Global Health and Social Medicine

IMG_0134

Giulia Impelluso, GHSM Alumna

When I graduated from the UG programme in GHSM at King’s College London in 2017, I felt lost, I did not know what I wanted to do or who I wanted to be. I therefore started a MSc in International Health Management at Imperial College Business School as I wanted to explore the economics of health as well as analyse my perception of healthcare through the lens of business. My master’s degree helped me build on what I had learnt in my undergraduate course and equipped me with significant skills to face the challenges of job hunting. I knew I wanted to work in healthcare, as that’s what I studied for and dreamed of, and I knew I wanted to make an impact in my community, be of help where there was most need and be challenged by real-world issues.

At the beginning of May 2018, I received a call from a No Caller ID, which I almost missed because in my head I was saying ‘IT IS SPAM’. Instead, it resulted to be a job offer! Good thing I picked up.

Back in December 2017, together with other 16,999 people, I applied to the NHS Graduate Scheme. It was the top choice in my ‘job list’ and when I submitted my application I thought ‘I am never getting this, it is too competitive, why would they take me …’, in short, I was being dramatic. I was actually wrong; I was firstly called to do an interview and then I was invited to the final selection stage; the Assessment Centre. I left the Assessment Centre in Leeds confident that I had done well: I had stayed focused all day, I finished all the tasks and managed to raise some good points during the group exercise.  However, I also knew that I had met bright people that deserved that spot just as much as I did. So, I waited a month to know whether it was a yes or a no, and it ended up being a maybe: I was 8th in the waiting list. Of course, my first reaction was of disappointment, but I then realised that I was 208 over 17,000 people and I still had a good chance to get in. Remember that call? Well, that call came exactly a month after the disappointing ‘waiting list’ email and I got an offer to be a General Management Trainee for the NHS 2018-2020! I was happy, proud and I felt so lucky. The most surprising thing of all is that I thought it would be so hard to get a job I liked as a first job, and at that moment I felt like I had achieved it.

I used to feel like I still had so much to learn, so much to do and still so long to go before I could say ‘I am so excited to start my new job’. Well, do not get me wrong, I definitely still have a long way to go but I can confidently say that I could not think of a better way to start my career journey than joining the NHS. It is certainly not an easy task to find the ‘right job’: it takes preparation, effort and a lot thinking and digging deeper to know yourself in and out. Spoiler? It is all worth it. From my experience, the way to actually find the ‘right job’ is to start job hunting. By going through different application processes, interviews and taking part in career events it is easier to exclude those job that do not suit your preferences. Despite it seeming a long, unrewarding and somewhat boring process, job hunting is an opportunity to discover yourself and find your path. It is then easier to know what ‘perfect’ means to you.

Good luck!

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Global Health, Global Health & Social Medicine and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s