Work led by GHSM HoD Professor Karen Glaser, part of ‘Grandparents in Europe Project’, cited in the Financial Times

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Professor Karen Glaser, Head of Department, GHSM

The work led by Professor Karen Glaser, Head of Department,  Global Health & Social Medicine, and Director, King’s Centre for Global Ageing, was cited in the Financial Times Times yesterday, in an article discusses the widening care gap in Europe as women take steps back from unpaid work:
“Grandparents, and in particular grandmothers, are also important childcare providers, especially in countries such as Spain, Italy and Romania, where there is little childcare support for parents. For women in business who have become used to relying on help from retired or semi-retired parents, Karen Glaser, sociology professor at King’s College London, identifies an impending “care gap” as European countries push back the retirement age”.

This research is part of the Grandparents in Europe Project , and funded by the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation. Project leader is Professor Karen Glaser, and co-applicants in the project are Professor Anthea Tinker (GHSM), Dr Giorgio Di Gessa (LSE), and Professor Deborah Price (Manchester University), among others.

The project,  supported by the Calouste Gulbenkian Foudation and working in partnership with Grandparents Plus and the Beth Johnson Foundation, investigates variations across Europe in the diversity of grandparents, how grandparents contribute to childcare, and how policies are related to patterns of grandparenting (with particular reference to childcare).   The objective of the study is to develop a clearer understanding of what types of family policies help to support the family including the extended family, and in what circumstances.

For more information about this project:

https://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/sshm/research/Research-Groups/Ageing-and-Society-research-group/Projects/Grandparenting-in-Europe.aspx

To read the full FT article click here:

https://www.ft.com/content/6e2f531a-867b-11e7-8bb1-5ba57d47eff7

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