The UK Bioethics Postgraduate Student Committee is currently recruiting!

The Postgraduate Student Committee (PSC) consists of an interdisciplinary group of postgraduate students working in bioethics broadly defined- we consist of healthcare practitioners, lawyers, ethicists and philosophers. The committee are responsible for supporting the organization and continuing success of the Postgraduate Bioethics Conference (PGBC), organizing bioethics events for PGRs and helping to grow the bioethics community. We work in conjunction with the Institute of Medical Ethics and our activities have been supported by the Wellcome Trust, The Analysis Trust and The Society for Applied Philosophy.

Joining the PSC is a great way to get more involved in the bioethics community. It provides opportunities to network, gain experience organising events and to build your grant history. We meet four times a year (usually 2 face-to-face meetings and 2 Skype) in different areas of the UK and travel costs will be reimbursed.

If you are interested in joining the committee please complete the short application form and send a CV to Georgina Morley at gm17072@bristol.ac.uk by the 22nd September 2017. You must be a current or incoming postgraduate student working in bioethics to apply.

The Postgraduate Student Committee work with the support of the Institute of Medical Ethics and are responsible for the continuity and success of future conferences. We are committed to nurturing a postgraduate community in bioethics and if you would like to contact us with suggestions/ ideas for the future please email us at:

postgrad.bioethics@outlook.com

  • Co-chairs: Georgina Morley (University of Bristol) and Louise Austin (University of Bristol)
  • David Lawrence (University of Newcastle)
  • Alexander Chrysanthou (University of Southampton)
  • Emma Nottingham (University of Southampton)
  • Sacha Waxman (University of Manchester)
  • Ruchi Baxi (University of Oxford)
  • Kate Sahan (University of Oxford)

 

 

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