Going on at King’s February 16th! Reading and discussion of ‘Deny, Deny’ acclaimed play about gene doping in sport by and with Jonathan Maitland

deny-denyI am delighted to announce that journalist, playwright and King’s College alumnus Jonathan Maitland, author of acclaimed playDeny, Deny’ , is coming to King’s for a reading and discussion of selected scenes from his play.

Professional actors including David Cann (from Chris Morris’s famous ‘Jam’ TV series on Channel 4), and Freddie Meredith, will read  selected scenes. Afterwards there will be time for Q&A and discussion  with the audience.

When: Thursday February 16th, 5:00 to 6:30 pm

Where: Pyramid Room, 4th floor King’s Building, King’s College Strand Campus

About the play:

Genetic technologies such as CRISPR genome editing now offer ways to edit the DNA not only for therapeutic but also for enhancement purposes. Does genetic enhancement count as doping? Some say it does, while others contend it is a matter of innovating, similar to a new training regime. This and others are some of the matters discussed in the play ‘Deny, Deny’, recently shown at Park Theatre. Eve, a promising young athlete, is offered a cutting edge new ‘therapy’ by her mysterious, charismatic coach. She says it will make her the fastest woman in the world: but is it as safe, legal and ethical as her coach claims? The play, set in the near future, takes its title from the first rule of the doper’s handbook: ‘deny everything, until you can’t’.

 

 

Many thanks to King’s Interdisciplinary Social Science Doctoral Training Centre (KISS-DTC) for supporting this event!

All are welcome!

Contact for this event: silvia.camporesi@kcl.ac.uk

Dr Silvia Camporesi is the Director of the Bioethics & Society Programme at King’s College London. She researches and teaches on issues of bioethics and sport.

You can find more info about the play here:

https://www.parktheatre.co.uk/whats-on/deny-deny-deny

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This entry was posted in Applied Ethics, Ethics & Sport, Philosophy of Sport, St. Bartholomew’s museum and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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