TODAY Seminar with Liz Dzeng ““The Influence of Hospital Culture and Policies on Do-Not-Resuscitate Decision-Making at the End of Life”.

We are delighted to announce a BIOS+ Research Seminar with Elizabeth (Liz) Dzeng, MD, PhD, MPH (http://profiles.ucsf.edu/elizabeth.dzeng).

When: Thursday May 5th 2016, 4 to 530 pm

Where: SW1.17 (East Wing, Somerset House, entrance from Dickson Poon School of Law)

Die2_1Liz will give a talk titled “The Influence of Hospital Culture and Policies on Do-Not-Resuscitate Decision-Making at the End of Life”. Dr Silvia Camporesi will be chairing the seminar.

Abstract:

In her talk Liz will present her current research which is focused on understanding how institutions might foster cultures that encourage palliative care and resist the tide of overly aggressive care at the end of life and the interaction between these ethical conflicts and physician moral distress, burnout, and declines in empathy. Liz wrote her PhD dissertation on the influence of institutional cultures and policies on physicians’ ethical beliefs and how that impacts the way they communicate in end of life decision-making conversations.

Bio:

Liz is Assistant Professor at UCSF in the Division of Hospital Medicine and Social and Behavioral Sciences, Sociology program. She is also a Visiting Fellow at the King’s College London Cicely Saunders Institute. She completed her PhD in Medical Sociology at the University of Cambridge at King’s College as a Gates Cambridge Scholar and a General Internal Medicine Post-Doctoral Clinical Research Fellow and Palliative Care Research Fellow at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

Liz has published several opinion pieces for the Guardian, Wired UK, Huffington Post. You can find out more about her research and public engagement activities here:

http://elizabethdzeng.com/

To contact Liz write to: Liz.Dzeng@ucsf.edu

The event is open and there is no need to register.

For information about the BIOS+ Research Group contact Dr Christine Aicardi: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/sshm/people/academic/christineaicardi.aspx

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