The Wellbeing, Health, Retirement and the Lifecourse project (WHERL) is pleased to invite you to an event to disseminate current research findings

VENUE: Prudential, Governor’s House,  Laurence Pountney Hill, London, EC4R 0HH

     Wednesday 13th April 2016—2.45pm—5.30pm  

 

WHERL is a three-year academic research project led by the Institute of Gerontology at King’s College London in partnership with 5 other institutions.

The project examines a crucial question for ageing societies: how inequalities across the life course relate to paid work in later life in the UK.

This issue is of growing importance since the UK, in common with many other governments across the world, is rapidly extending the working lives of older adults through the postponement of State Pension Age (SPA) and other measures. We need to understand the lifelong drivers affecting the complex relationship between paid work in later life, health and wellbeing.

Programme*:

14:45       Registration and Refreshments.

15:15       Welcome from Chair, Professor Ruth Hancock

15:25       Introduction to the project from Professor Karen Glaser

15:40       Dr Laurie M Corna: Patterns of work up to and beyond State Pension Age, and their relationship to earlier life course histories 16.00 Dr Loretta G Platts: Returns to work after retirement: A prospective study of unretirement from the United Kingdom.

16:20       Dr Giorgio Di Gessa: Are there health benefits to working beyond State Pension Age?

16:40       Dr Rebecca Benson: How does health affect working beyond state pension age?

17:00       Dr Gayan Perera: Paid employment and common mental disorders in 50-64 year olds

17:20       Chair’s summary

17:30       Close and networking session

Please RSVP to Jennifer Summers on wherl@pensionspolicyinstitute.org.uk no later than1st April 2016.

 

*agenda maybe subject to minimal changes

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About jamesrupertfletcher

PhD candidate at the Institute of Gerontology, King's College London. Interested in dementia, health & social care and social theory. @JamesRuFletcher
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