PhD candidate James Fletcher wins prestigious “The World in 2065” ESRC & SAGE 50th anniversary award

We are delighted to announce that SSHM PhD candidate James Rupert Fletcher has won a prestigious essay competition celebrating the 50thanniversaries of the ESRC and SAGE.

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The competition, entitled “The World in 2065” invited ESRC funded PhD students to submit an 800 word article outlining their vision for the future of the social sciences over the next 50 years. Over 70 entries were received. James submitted a mock retrospective of London’s development from 2015 to 2065, positing an unnerving dystopian/utopian world of decentralisation and corporatisation. Ten finalists from around the UK were invited to a morning publication workshop at SAGE Publications lead by Senior Commissioning Editor Mila Steele. Following an enjoyable and informative session, the finalists were taken to the House of Commons for the awards ceremony, during which the results were announced by ESRC Chair Dr Alan Gillespie. James was awarded the first prize of £1000 for his entry. James wishes to express thanks to all those who made the event possible and to Professor Debora Price and Giulia Cavaliere for representing King’s and supporting him at the event. The result is further recognition of the continuing ascendency of KCL’s work across the social sciences. His winning entry is available here.

After receiving the prize, James said: “Absolutely thrilled to have come first against such strong competition (and to have got away with denouncing government whilst in parliament). I hope that my entwined dystopia/utopia makes people contemplate the ways in which our work will shape the future, and what kind of future we want that to be.”

James is working with Professor Nick Manning & Professor Karen Glaser on a PhD project titled “Care Networks from the Perspectives of People with Dementia” funded by the Economic & Social Research Council.

You can read James’ essay here and contact him here: james.fletcher@kcl.ac.uk

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