Congratulations to Roisin Dillon MHPP students for being awarded the Oxford University’s 2018 “Map the System Challenge” award!

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Roisin Dillon, MHPP student and receiver of the Oxford University’s 2018 “Map the System Challenge” award

Huge congratulations to Roisin Dillon, one of GHSM postgraduate students, for being awarded the top prize in Oxford University’s ‘Map the System Challenge’ competition.

This is a global competition in which students are asked to undertake research on a social or environmental issue they feel passionately about.

 

Roisin’s presentation on the opioid crisis came first out of 470 entries from 27 different universities across the globe. Details about the winners of this year’s competition will be up on the “Map the System’ website soon.

In an interview with 660 News, Roisin explains that “We’re oversimplifying the problem and we have a lot of misconceptions and assumptions about who might be experiencing any kind of struggle with opiate addiction.” Roisin argues that public health solutions need to tackle over-prescribing and the assumption that we should eradicate pain at all costs, rather than helping people to manage it.

See the news report here: http://www.660news.com/2018/06/06/calgarian-recent-mru-valedictorian-wins-oxford-competition-opioid-presentation/

Roisin is studying on our MSc in Medicine, Health and Public Policy. 

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Book launch and drinks reception: Jenny Reardon’s The Postgenomic Condition Tuesday June 26th 6 pm

Please join us for a panel discussion and Q&A session with the audience which will be followed by a drinks reception.

Where: Room 1.02, Bush House, North East Wing

When: 26/06/2018 (18:00-19:30)

Cover-of-Postgenomic-ConditionJenny Reardon. The Postgenomic Condition: Ethics, Justice, and Knowledge after the Genome. 2017, University of Chicago Press.

All are welcome but please email Amy Hinterberger (a.hinterberger@warwick.ac.ukto confirm your attendance for catering purposes.

Now that we have sequenced the human genome, what does it mean? In The Postgenomic Condition, Jenny Reardon critically examines the decade after the Human Genome Project, and the fundamental questions about meaning, value and justice this landmark achievement left in its wake. Drawing on more than a decade of research—in molecular biology labs, commercial start-ups, governmental agencies, and civic spaces—Reardon demonstrates how the extensive efforts to transform genomics from high tech informatics practiced by a few to meaningful knowledge beneficial to all exposed the limits of long-cherished liberal modes of knowing and governing life.

Panellist Speakers and Biographies:

Lydia Nicholas, is a PhD Candidate in Human Computer Interaction at University College London, Interaction Centre and Great Ormond Street Hospital.

Jenny Reardon, is a Professor of Sociology and the Founding Director of the Science and Justice Research Center at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is a Visiting Professor in the Department of Global Health & Social Medicine at King’s College London.

Charis Thompson, is a Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics and Chancellor’s Professor of Gender & Women’s Studies at the University of California, Berkeley.

Link to the book and review quotes: http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/P/bo22726485.html

Podcast about the book: http://newbooksnetwork.com/jenny-reardon-the-postgenomic-condition-ethics-knowledge-and-justice-after-the-genome-u-chicago-press-2017/

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Science Meets Science-Fiction – with Dr Christine Aicardi June 13th 6:30-8 pm

Dr Christine Aicardi, Foresight Lab of the Department of Global Health & Social Medicine at King’s, and SciFi authors Pippa Goldschmidt, Stephen Oram and Geoff Ryman, have collaborated with scientists in the Department of Developmental Neurobiology and the Department of Twin Research & Genetic Epidemiology, to turn current lab research into sci fi short stories.

maxresdefaultA first event took place at Gordon Museum of Pathology, bringing together an audience of scientists from the collaborating labs and elsewhere. The reading of the stories was used as springboard for an evening of lively discussions, boosted by provocative and passionate panellists drawn from literature, neuroscience, philosophy, history, anthropology and medicine.

A follow-up, general public event is to take place at Waterstones in Tottenham Court Road on June 13th, 6.30-8.30pm.

Here is the link to register: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/science-meets-science-fiction-near-future-fictions-tickets-45744490001.

The organising team will be delighted to welcome as many of you as possible on this occasion – please circulate the invitation!

The project ‘Transforming Future Science through Science Fiction’ is run by Dr Christine Aicardi, in collaboration with near-future fiction writer Stephen Oram and Virtual Futures. The project is supported by the Cultural Institute at King’s College London, and by the Human Brain Project under European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme.

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“From my Bachelors Degree to my first job” – blog post by Giulia Impelluso, GHSM alumna

Blog post by Giulia Impelluso

Alumna of the Undergraduate Programme Global Health and Social Medicine

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Giulia Impelluso, GHSM Alumna

When I graduated from the UG programme in GHSM at King’s College London in 2017, I felt lost, I did not know what I wanted to do or who I wanted to be. I therefore started a MSc in International Health Management at Imperial College Business School as I wanted to explore the economics of health as well as analyse my perception of healthcare through the lens of business. My master’s degree helped me build on what I had learnt in my undergraduate course and equipped me with significant skills to face the challenges of job hunting. I knew I wanted to work in healthcare, as that’s what I studied for and dreamed of, and I knew I wanted to make an impact in my community, be of help where there was most need and be challenged by real-world issues.

At the beginning of May 2018, I received a call from a No Caller ID, which I almost missed because in my head I was saying ‘IT IS SPAM’. Instead, it resulted to be a job offer! Good thing I picked up.

Back in December 2017, together with other 16,999 people, I applied to the NHS Graduate Scheme. It was the top choice in my ‘job list’ and when I submitted my application I thought ‘I am never getting this, it is too competitive, why would they take me …’, in short, I was being dramatic. I was actually wrong; I was firstly called to do an interview and then I was invited to the final selection stage; the Assessment Centre. I left the Assessment Centre in Leeds confident that I had done well: I had stayed focused all day, I finished all the tasks and managed to raise some good points during the group exercise.  However, I also knew that I had met bright people that deserved that spot just as much as I did. So, I waited a month to know whether it was a yes or a no, and it ended up being a maybe: I was 8th in the waiting list. Of course, my first reaction was of disappointment, but I then realised that I was 208 over 17,000 people and I still had a good chance to get in. Remember that call? Well, that call came exactly a month after the disappointing ‘waiting list’ email and I got an offer to be a General Management Trainee for the NHS 2018-2020! I was happy, proud and I felt so lucky. The most surprising thing of all is that I thought it would be so hard to get a job I liked as a first job, and at that moment I felt like I had achieved it.

I used to feel like I still had so much to learn, so much to do and still so long to go before I could say ‘I am so excited to start my new job’. Well, do not get me wrong, I definitely still have a long way to go but I can confidently say that I could not think of a better way to start my career journey than joining the NHS. It is certainly not an easy task to find the ‘right job’: it takes preparation, effort and a lot thinking and digging deeper to know yourself in and out. Spoiler? It is all worth it. From my experience, the way to actually find the ‘right job’ is to start job hunting. By going through different application processes, interviews and taking part in career events it is easier to exclude those job that do not suit your preferences. Despite it seeming a long, unrewarding and somewhat boring process, job hunting is an opportunity to discover yourself and find your path. It is then easier to know what ‘perfect’ means to you.

Good luck!

Posted in Global Health, Global Health & Social Medicine | Tagged | Leave a comment

Report of 3rd Annual Culture Medicine & Power Writing Retreat

Blog post by Tara Mahfoud

The Culture Medicine & Power research group held its 3rd annual writing retreat on 19-20 January in Walberswick on the Suffolk Coast of England. The goal of the retreat is to inspire creativity and confidence in academic writing, focusing on creating a supportive environment where CMP members can generate new material, experiment with different writing styles, brainstorm new ideas for future projects or articles, as well as share and receive feedback on preliminary writing. Here is what CMP members had to say about the retreat:

IMG_4223“The writing retreat was a creative, fun, and learning-filled weekend. It was a perfect place to explore and share written work, and it gave me plenty food for thought on how to present work in the future.  As a first-year PhD student, it was a great opportunity to meet and interact with colleagues and department professors in a different environment.”

  • Emma Wynne Bannister

“As a first year PhD student, the writing retreat provided the best opportunity I’ve had so far to get to know others from the department. Not only do I now have people to call on to discuss academic themes, or theoretical approaches, but I also feel more connected to the work of the wider research group, and department. It was really fun to experiment with novel writing techniques and styles, and surprisingly easy- despite my initial fears of self-consciousness. I have already implemented a few of the techniques in my writing since.”

  • Sally King

IMG_4215“Through utilizing a series of creative exercises in a supportive and kind environment, the writing retreat allowed me to explore new writing styles and break from my rigid ways of writing. This experience was very enriching I still reflect on it and the lessons I learned in it.”

  • Zeina Amro

Programme – Day 1

8:00-9:00                   Breakfast

 9:00-9:45                   Writing Exercise 1: Telegraphic

9:45-10:30                Writing Exercise 2: Choose your own style

10:30-11:00              Coffee Break

11:00-11:45              Writing Exercise 3: Decision Tree

11:45-12:30              Writing Exercise 4: Choose your own style

12:30-1:30                Lunch Break

2:00-3:30       Writing Exercise 5: Identifying stylistic features.

Pick a page or two of writing by one of your favourite authors – this                                     could be an academic piece of work, fiction, poetry, journalism, or                                   anything that inspires you! Read it over and over again, copy it down                     word for word, and in so doing, try to identify its stylistic features. Note                   these down.

3:30-5:00       Writing Exercise 6: Emulating style.

Choose a piece of writing from your own work, and try to rewrite it in                      the style of the author you have chosen. You need to use your own                                 words, of course, but try to imagine how this author would have written                  your text.

7:30-9:30                   Dinner

Programme – Day 2

8:00-9:00                   Breakfast

 9:00-9:45                   Writing Exercise 7: Auditory, olfactory, or tactile

9:45-10:30                Independent writing

10:30-11:00              Coffee Break

11:00-11:45              Writing Exercise 8: Write a mini-story in the first person.

Take on the persona of one of your interlocutors or, if you prefer,                             a fictional person.

11:45-12:30              Independent writing

12:30-1:30                Lunch Break

2:00-3:30                   Writing Exercise 9: Writing with an image.

Bring an image from your fieldwork or research and exchange it                             with your neighbour. Use their image to tell a story prompted by                         it.

3:30-5:00                   Writing Exercise 10: Recycle.

Go back to a piece of old work that you never published or                                       integrated into your dissertation. Take a line from it and write a                                new story based on it.

7:30-9:30                   Dinner

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